Figo Bank

Helping a new generation of young professionals save for life's biggest goals.

Project overview

The Figo Bank mobile app was the product of a 5 day design sprint hosted by BrainStation in partnership with RBC. Throughout the weeklong process, our group was given a Q+A session with a senior level member from RBC's design team for guidance and direction. At the end of the sprint, we presented our process and final outcomes to a panel of RBC designers and BrainStation instructors.

Project Type: Design Sprint

Timeline: 5 Days

Role: Lead UI Designer

Tools: Figma, InVision

The problem

Figo is a Canadian neobank with a web platform where their clients can manage their personal finances. Recently, there has been high demand for Figo to launch a native mobile app. Since the Figo website already enables clients to manage their finances, Figo asked us to come up with an idea that provides unique and supplementary value to their website.
RESEARCHING + PLANNING

Day One

Conducting research

Before starting the design sprint, the client supplied information on who they believe will be the primary users for this mobile app. We used this information to form a proto-persona and as a basis for our interview participant criteria.

👉 Aged 23–29 years old

👉 Has recently graduated

👉 Landed first full-time job

👉 Facing first major debt

Common savings goals, sabotaged by bad habits.

“My goal is to buy a car and house one day, but I get tempted by material things unfortunately.”
“I want to be able to save 50% of my income, but my splurging kind of prevents that.”

Unwilling to try and become financially literate.

“As long as I know how to pay bills, then I’m fine. The rest is for finance people.”
“I want quick, easy facts. I don’t really want to learn anything. I don’t have time to spend on it.”

Conditionally distrusting of financial robo-advisory.

“I don’t think banks have my best interest. I think they have their own interests in mind.”
“I think if the bank could help me reach smaller goals that they don't directly make money on, I would trust it more.”

Finding the right point of intervention in the user’s journey

We created a user journey map to pin-point the best opportunities for our design to help people achieve their financial goals. We decided the best point of intervention was after the user has been paid, but before they make any impulsive spending decisions. It’s a tight window of time, but we knew if we could remind users of their financial goals before they spent the money, they’d be far less likely to make impulsive purchases.

Exploring HMW’s

After collectively brainstorming 22 potential How Might We statements, we dot-voted and came to a tie between two options.

HMW Option 1

How might we tailor the experience of achieving financial goals to each user so they feel more in control of their finances?

HMW Option 2

How might we make saving a simple process, so that young professionals can grow their wealth without being financial experts?
Rather than picking one over the other, we synthesized the two into our final HMW.

How might we create a simple and tailored banking experience, so that young professionals can set and achieve their savings goals?

INSPIRATION + SKETCHING

Day Two

Rapid ideation sketching

After creating an inspiration board on InVision and identifying features, ideas, and elements we wanted to incorporate into our designs, we spent roughly an hour rapidly sketching our ideas. We then dot-voted and collectively agreed on our favourite elements from each sketch.

👈 What we liked...

✅  Placing the primary goal card at the top of the page. This will help remind people why they're saving.
✅  Having a manual contribution button right on the goal card itself.

What we liked... 👉

✅  Once again, having the primary goal cards above even the account information. Reminding people of what they're saving for so they can make better decisions.
✅  Displaying account information, even though Figo already has an online banking platform. We wanted the goal-setting app to access the accounts directly.
✅  Incorporating "passive savings" from a feature that rounds every purchase up to the nearest dollar and saves the difference.

👈 What we liked...

✅  Visual depictions of saving goals that users can select when first signing up with the app.
✅  Getting users to commit to saving their money for a life goal.
✅  Friendly and encouraging copy.

Establishing a crude user flow diagram

Before recreating our sketches as high fidelity screens, we mapped out the required screens for our minimum viable product. This acted as a general roadmap for the high-fidelity prototyping stage.
DESIGNING THE INTERFACE

Day Three

Brand guidelines

Since Figo Bank is an already established brand we were required to design the app using their brand’s colour palette and typographic styles. We were given two neutral colours, 4 brand colours, and the typeface "Avenir" to work with.

High fidelity prototyping

Being the lead designer and going from user flow to high fidelity prototype in 12 hours was a huge undertaking for me. I owe a huge part of that process to my amazing team who helped gather assets, wrote content, accounted for state changes, and pieced the screens together in the final prototype.

Click here to try the final prototype
USER TESTING

Day Four

User Testing

Before presenting our final prototype, we conducted 5 user tests to identify areas where we could improve the user experience. Although we didn’t have time in the sprint to implement these changes, it was important for us to present our next steps to the panel from RBC.

Low contrast elements (white + green) that didn't pass accessibility requirements.

Small text that did not pass accessibility guidelines or Apple's Human Interface Guidelines.

Overall, testers didn’t understand how to make manual contributions to their goals.

PRESENTING OUR WORK

Day Five

Presentations + feedback

Our presentation to the RBC and BrainStation panel went really well! Alex from RBC had a few questions that challenged our design decisions. For instance, why the goal cards were placed above the user’s account information, or how we’d account for and standardize the user being able to input their own images. We also received some high complements from Franz and Jeff from RBC on the visual design and application of the brand guidelines.
Our group presenting. Myself, Calvin Kuo, Izzy Lourdes, Richard Szeto pictured top to bottom.

What I've learned from this project

Our presentation to the RBC and BrainStation panel went really well! Alex from RBC had a few questions that challenged our design decisions. For instance, why the goal cards were placed above the user’s account information, or how we’d account for and standardize the user being able to input their own images. We also received some high complements from Franz and Jeff from RBC on the visual design and application of the brand guidelines.

🐢 Move slowly so that you can move quickly.

The 5-day design sprint is an intense process with tight timelines, which can make skipping steps feel justified. But what I’ve learned from this sprint, is that by taking my time in each step of the process I was able to move much quicker when designing the final prototype.

❌ Accessibility shouldn’t be an afterthought.

When I was working on the high fidelity screens I was so focused on making everything look great that I made accessibility an afterthought. The final interface has small, unreadable text, and low-contrast elements that would make the app unusable for some users.

🤝 Learning to let go and trust my team.

As someone who considers himself a perfectionist, I generally want to have a say or hand in every part of a project. However, the constraints of the design sprint forced me to focus on my strengths and trust that my teammates were going to do the exact same thing. And even though I had limited input on many of the decisions made, my teammates did an excellent job.

Like what you see?

I'm currently available for both full-time and freelance opportunities. I'm also always open to coffee chats about design, technology, or anything else. Reach out if you're interested in working together, or if you want to chat!
me@danielguerra.ca
647-865-4539